Monday, February 5, 2018

Why Trump’s FBI head Christopher Wray urged withholding the Nunes memo



The following article appeared in the American Thinker on February 2nd


When the FBI objected to release of the Nunes memo, at the reported urging of President Trump’s hand-picked successor to James Comey as FBI Director, Christopher Wray, the temptation to dismiss him as another deep state operative was understandable. All the more so when CNN and The Daily Beast’s fabulist Spencer Ackerman pushed the story that he was ready to resign yesterday. Naturally, the rest of the Trump-hating media picked up the story and ran with feverish hopes for a second Saturday Night Massacre, with its scent of President [Nixon’s] departure in disgrace 45years ago..

Maybe so. But maybe the story is a little more complex, and maybe President Trump has his reasons for continuing to express confidence in the man he chose to reform a powerful agency that appears to have been hijacked at the top executive level.
Christopher Wray
For starters, the resignation threat appears to be fake news (again!).  Streiff of RedState:

…CNN has walked back their story

Wray has not directly threatened to resign after clashing with Trump over the possible release of the memo, the source added, because that is not his style of dealing with conflict.


Another person familiar with discussions about the memo said Wray didn’t threaten to quit when he met with Kelly earlier this week and in numerous conversations since, but White House chief of staff John Kelly believes that is a real possibility and has been working on a way to avoid another departure from an already turbulent Trump administration.


There is a recognition, however, that Wray leaving could set off a chain reaction of events inside the law enforcement agency. Top officials inside the bureau have been trying to identify who might be considered a “Trump guy” in the order of succession in the bureau’s organizational chart, another law enforcement official said.

The operant word in the last paragraph is “could” – which means CNN hopes it happens but has no basis for claiming it will happen.

Streiff thinks Wray was “suckered” earlier, but now knows better:

I suspect that about the time Wray told McCabe to pack his sh** and get off the battlefield he realized that he’s been suckered into supporting senior staff who are deeply and maybe criminally compromised. Wray may be angry about being ignored on the memo but he’s going to be furious about being set up for a public buggering.

I have another theory, and Paul Sperry of the New York Post today provides a counterpoint that pays the groundwork:

FBI Director Christopher Wray is slowly but surely sweeping partisan operatives out of the bureau’s executive suites all on his own. On the job just a few months, Wray told Congress in December he wanted to wait and see the evidence before taking any action against high-level investigators accused of bias and misconduct. Over the weekend, he saw some of that evidence, and it convinced him to remove his own deputy, Andrew McCabe.

“Wray is a smart, experienced attorney,” former assistant FBI Director Ron Hosko told me. “He’s not gonna fold to BS pressure with no facts, so he saw something solid, something from the agency’s inspector general, who has been investigating political conflicts and irregularities involving McCabe for more than a year.”

Whatever Wray saw wasn’t manufactured by the White House. It came from Justice Department watchdog Michael Horowitz, who launched his probe at the request of Democrats.

My guess (it is only a guess because I have no contact with him) is that Wray understands the enormity of the task he faces, and is taking a slow and deliberate approach to it. He is in many ways like a new CEO recruited to turn around a large corporation, but without the ability to lay off people, close or sell poorly performing divisions and cumbersome civil service protections constraining his ability to discipline his troops. He has barely 3 months in office at this point.

(Article continues HERE)

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